Nelson & His World

Discussion on the life and times of Admiral Lord Nelson
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 Post subject: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 10:43 am 
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Thought posters here might like a little reminding of a famous anniversary today and that being the defeat of Napoleon at the Battle of Waterloo, 18th June 1815.
Interestingly I wonder if anyone knows of any former sailors who may have enrolled in Wellington's Army and also fought in this famous Battle? Interesting :?:


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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 11:44 am 
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Thanks for the reminder, Stephen.

I have just started reading the book about Napoleon in Exile that I mentioned on another thread. The author, Sir Brian Unwin, admires Wellington above all other generals. ('He never lost a battle.') and this aroused his interest in a period of Napoleon's life, after his defeat, that has been little explored by historians but which has generated a great deal of mystery and rumour.

I was interested to note that by 31 July 1815, barely 6 weeks after Waterloo, the decision was taken to send Napoleon to St Helena, so there wasn't much hanging about in getting him well out of the way - unsurprising, in view of all the trouble he'd caused.

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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:00 pm 
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I thought this suggestion - that the name of Waterloo Station should be changed in deference to French sensibilities - would amuse.

http://www.london-se1.co.uk/forum/read/1/6233

I recall visiting Parliament some years ago and seeing a huge mural of Waterloo which apparently had caused much offence to a visiting French dignitary.

I might add that Apsley House, the London home of the Duke of Wellington, is well worth a visit. It has one of my favourite pictures of Nelson, engraved by Hodgett, after Beechey. The original is in the Royal Collection. Here it is: (if the link works.) Click on the third image down to get an enlargement.

http://www.grosvenorprints.com/stock.ph ... d=cockspur

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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 12:57 pm 
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Anna, Have visited Apsley House a number of times and yes worth the visit. A great shame though was that Merton was never preserved for the nation. :(


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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 3:58 pm 
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When the British Government was considering whether Napoleon's remains should be removed from St Helena and returned to France, it was thought prudent to ask the opinion of the Duke of Wellington about the matter.

This was his (oh, so characteristic) reply:

'Field Marshal the Duke of Wellington presents his compliments to Her Majesty's Ministers. If they wish to know his opinion as a matter of public policy he must decline to give one. If, however, they wish only to consult him as a private individual he has no hesitation in saying that he does not care one twopenny damn what becomes of the ashes of Napoleon Bonaparte.'


In an idle moment this afternoon, I imagined how Nelson, had he survived Trafalgar and lived on into Victoria's reign, might have replied to a similar invitation to express his views about the removal of Boney's bones.

Admiral Lord Nelson presents his compliments to Her Majesty’s Ministers and begs that they will have the kindness to reflect upon some words he wrote before the great and glorious victory over the combined fleet at Trafalgar: that ‘magnanimity after victory be the predominant feature of the British fleet.’ That this aspiration was fulfilled in the humanity shown to French prisoners by brave British seamen after the battle at sea, and to Buonaparte himself by His Late Gracious Majesty King George, let no man dispute. In death, the earthly remains of the former Emperor are deserving of that reverence which our religion and customs teach us we owe to the dead, whether friend or foe, of every nation. As for his soul: we must leave the judgment of that to a Power far higher and mightier than that of the humble and obedient servant of Her Majesty's Ministers,

Nelson & Bronte.

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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 4:35 pm 
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:D

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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 4:43 pm 
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Don Miguel-Ricardo de Alava was at both Trafalgar and Waterloo, Alava had been posted to the 'Santa Ana,' the 112-gun flagship of his uncle, Vice-Admiral Ignacio-Maria de Alava y Saenz de Navarrete at Trafalgar and was on Wellington's field staff as Spanish Commissioner and was present at the Battle of Waterloo on 18 June.

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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 5:50 pm 
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Post Captain, Now thats really fascinating in the least to claim two of the greatest Battles in World History, although I have always regarded Lepanto 1571 as running pretty close. The debate opens. :)


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 Post subject: Re: 18th June 1815
PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2010 7:20 pm 
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tycho wrote:
I thought this suggestion - that the name of Waterloo Station should be changed in deference to French sensibilities - would amuse.

http://www.london-se1.co.uk/forum/read/1/6233



Regarding Waterloo station offending, going further back to 1815, Blucher after he entered Paris wanted to blow up Pont d'Iéna, named after a severe defeat on the Prussians in 1806. But i believe he was prevented from doing so by Wellington, some say by the expedient of posting one of his redcoats on the bridge.

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