Nelson & His World

Discussion on the life and times of Admiral Lord Nelson
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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Monuments
PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2012 8:21 pm 
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Trimmer wrote:
If you were on foot next week and wanted details of the places of interest on the way, I would be glad to share them with you.


Richard, that would be great if you could!

The plan so far is to walk from St Paul's to Trafalgar Square, calling in at the NPG, then down Whitehall past the Admiralty building, to Westminster. I hadn't known about Somerset House, we'll have to fit that in, thanks.

It's funny, I live and work in London and I've been to or passed by all of these places before, but didn't know their significance.

Thanks so much for your help :)


(ps. I've changed the title of the thread to be more relevant)

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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2012 12:12 am 
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Vicki,
I will try and make this as clear as possible, and hope it is of interest!
When you leave St Paul's and join Ludgate Hill look to your left for Creed Ct and Pilgrim Street joining Ludgate Hill. In Nelson's lifetime Situated half way between the two would have been 9 Ludgate Street. This was the address of: The Capital Lace Warehouse. It was here on 5th April 1775 that Nelson's younger sister Ann took up residence as one of seven apprentices. It is thought likely that Nelson would at some point have cast a protective eye over the establishment.
A little further along Ludgate Hill, to your right, you of course have the Old Bailey. In December 1787 Nelson gave evidence on behalf of the former master of Boreas, James Carse.

Leaving Ludgate Hill and Fleet street, you join the Strand. As you pass the Royal courts of justice and St Clements Church, you will arrive on your left hand side Arundel Street. In Nelson's London, Running south from the Strand between Arundel Street and Surrey Street (the next road along), would have been Norfolk Street.
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23 Norfolk Street was the Adress of Nelson's bankers Marsh & Creed. As you can see from the map their offices were at the far end of the street near the Thames.

Continuing along the Strand you next come to Somerset house, which was spoken about in our previous post.

The first lodging's Nelson took in London were 3 Salisbury Street, Like Norfolk Street this road ran south from the Strand down toward the Thames. It was located between Adam Street and Carting Lane, almost opposite Southampton Street.
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As you can see from the map the address was at the Strand end of the street. A fine example of the style of property that would have been found in Salisbury Street, can still be seen at 33 Surrey Street.

Just before you reach Charing Cross station you will see a Mcdonalds restaurant. Located here was Salter's the silversmiths. John Salter was one of the finest silversmiths of his generation. He was sword cutler and jeweller to H.R.H Duke of Sussex, and was employed by Nelson on several ocassions. On the 21st August 1805 Nelson visited Salter's and famously ordered a childs silver knife, fork and spoon set and a silver gilt cup all engraved with his daughters name. Following Nelson's death John Salter produced mourning rings which are still to this day highly desirable to collectors. Salter also took an active interest in Horatia Nelson's welfare following the death of her parents. I June 1830 John Salter became godparent to Horatia's fourth son Nelson Ward. In 1823 he moved premises from 35 to 73 the Strand, the corner of Adam Street, where he stayed until hiis death in 1834.

Directly opposite Charing Cross station, where we now find Duncannon Street was another of Nelson's early lodgings:3 Lancaster Court, he stayed here in 1784 either side of his trip to France in an attempt to learn the language.

Back on the Thames side of the Strand, once you pass Charing Cross, there is a slip road on your left this takes you down into Craven Street. This is one of my favourite streets in London. Walking into Craven Street is like walking into a time warp. Number 3 Craven Street was the offices of Nelson's solicitor William Haslewood. The actual building no longer survives but an impressive terrace of Georgian property can still be seen in Craven Street. I can not recall any accounts of Nelson visiting the offices, Wiliam Haslewood would more often visit Nelson.

Hope you have been able to follow this Vicki, I much prefer St James, Piccadilly and Bond street areas, much more interesting. A bit further afield, my favourite site of all is: Little Titchfield Street, it was awesome to stand on that spot contemplating the happy times Nelson had spent there playing with his baby daughter!
Everyone must have thought I was bonkers!
Richard


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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2012 10:49 am 
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Wow Richard! That's really fascinating, thankyou so much.

Trimmer wrote:
Hope you have been able to follow this Vicki, I much prefer St James, Piccadilly and Bond street areas, much more interesting. A bit further afield, my favourite site of all is: Little Titchfield Street, it was awesome to stand on that spot contemplating the happy times Nelson had spent there playing with his baby daughter!


I don't suppose you have any more maps & info about those places, do you? :wink: Am I right in thinking Nelson had lodgings there? I realise I'm asking a lot, so no worries if it's too much. I suspect people (including my friend who I am dragging along on this trip) will think I am just as 'bonkers' as you! :lol:

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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Wed Aug 22, 2012 10:55 pm 
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Vicki,
Glad the information was of interest, of course I would be glad to share the other information I have collected. I will do it one section at a time. For now, I will give you details of the second half of the 1805 club walk. This took us from Trafalgar square to St George’s Church, Hanover square.
Leave Trafalgar square, and proceed onto Pall Mall. On your left you quickly reach Waterloo Place, which leads onto Carlton house Terrace.
Carlton House-This was the sight of the London residence of the Prince regent. On 11 September 1805, Nelson grudgingly complied to a command for an audience with the Prince prior to leaving for Trafalgar.
Re-join Pall Mall via Carlton House Gardens, directly opposite enter St James Square. In the far left hand corner you will see.

9 St James Square (now number 11)-This was the home of Nelson’s friend, advisor and prize agent Alexander Davison. The house is still exactly as Nelson would have known it. Davison purchased the property in 1798 for £25,000. During his brief spells in London, Nelson would conduct many of his meetings from this address. (below 9 St James Square)
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Leaving St James square via King Street, look to your right for the junction with Bury Street.

Nerot’s Hotel- On King Street almost directly opposite Bury Street is where Nerot’s Hotel was situated. Nerot’s opened in 1776; it moved to Clifford Street in 1835. The King Street building was then demolished the same year. On 8 November 1800 it was the scene of Nelson’s reunion with his wife, following a three year absence. The scene was shared in the company of Edmund Nelson, William Hamilton and a six month pregnant Emma. (Oh, to have been a fly on the wall!)
Follow King Street to its junction with St James Street, and then turn left. At the junction with Pall Mall you will arrive at:

St James Palace -Nelson attended numerous King’s levees at St James Palace. The first in 1783 at which he was warmly received by his Sovereign. Unfortunately this would not always prove to be the case.
Return onto St James Street and walk toward Piccadilly, on your right half way along the first parade of shops you will see:

Lock & Co-The most famous hat company in the world, Lock & Co have been trading from these same premises since 1670. The shop is still as Nelson would have known it when calling here just a couple of days before leaving for Trafalgar. Receipts for some of Nelson’s hats still appear in the company ledgers.
A little further up on the right hand side, opposite Brooks club, at the junction with Park Place, would have been the location of:

Hannah Humphrey’s print shop. - Never visited by Nelson but I had to include this. I am a great fan of James Gillray’s work; it was at this shop that his work would be displayed to the public.

On the left hand side of St James Street, just past Bennet Street would have been:

54 St James Street- Expecting Nelson home for Christmas 1799, Frances Nelson rented lodgings at this location.
(below a map of St James Street, King Street & St James Square)
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When you reach Piccadilly, directly opposite you will see the Albemarle Street

u]44 Albemarle Street, Gordon’s Hotel[/u].-The hotel was just a few properties back from Piccadilly on the left hand side of the road. Nelson took rooms at Gordon’s hotel during his last stay in London.

Two addresses on Piccadilly figure in Nelson’s story, both are close to where Piccadilly Circus is now located:

19 & 23 Piccadilly.- 19 was a flat above a saddler’s shop rented by Nelson following the death of William Hamilton. For proprieties sake he could not be seen co-habiting with Emma.
23 was the home taken by William & Emma Hamilton following their return from Naples. It was at this address on 6 April 1803 that William Hamilton died, with both Emma and Nelson by his side.

The outline for the proposed Piccadilly Circus appears on the map. From this you can see the position of 19 & 23 in relation to the current road layout.
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Travelling back along Piccadilly toward Green Park two roads on your right hand side are of interest:

17 Dover Street-This was the last address the Nelson’s shared as a married couple. The house would have been located just after the junction with Stafford Street, on the right hand side of the street.

21 Clarges Street- When entering Clarges Street from Piccadilly 21 would have been just beyond half way on the right hand side. This was Emma Hamilton’s London residence following the death of her husband Sir William Hamilton.
Returning along Piccadilly on your left just beyond Albemarle Street is Old Bond Street. Turn left and follow the road through to New Bond Street. On the left just after the junction with Bruton Street you will see:

141 Bond Street-This address displays a distinguishing blue plaque recording Nelson’s stay in 1797. Nelson and his wife stayed here following his return from Santa Cruz, where he had suffered the loss of his arm. It was at this residence that Nelson was famously disturbed by a mob celebrating Admiral Duncan’s victory at Camperdown.

96 Bond Street- Now numbered 103; this property can be found on the right hand side of the road half way between the junctions of Brook Street and Blenheim Street. This is the only property in London that displays the official council blue plaque recording a Nelson connection.
If you return back down New Bond Street until you reach Maddox Street then turn left. Follow Maddox Street for a couple of hundred yards you will reach:

St George’s Church, Hanover Square- Following his recovery from the loss of his arm Nelson sent a letter of thanksgiving to St Georges. The original is no longer at the Church but they still have a photocopy of the letter which they kindly showed me when I visited. It reads:

An officer desires to return thanks to Almighty God for his perfect recovery from a severe wound, and also for the many mercies bestowed upon him.

December 8, 1797


I will try and post some more soon Vicki!
Richard.


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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2012 6:46 pm 
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That's incredible, thankyou so much! :D

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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 10:13 am 
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Devenish wrote:
Enjoy your walk, you'll have to tell us all about it, perhaps with photos?

Well, since you asked... :wink:

http://chasingnelson.blogspot.co.uk/201 ... ee-in.html

I've walked some of these streets (eg the Strand and Whitehall) a few times before, but imagining how it would have looked in Nelson's time, and knowing that I am following his footsteps (sort of) gives it a whole new dimension.

Unfortunately due to the weather and being tight on time we didn't get to detour through the places Richard mentioned :( But, I plan to do that (along with any more he and anyone else gives me!) at a later date.

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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Sat Sep 01, 2012 12:03 pm 
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Vicki,

I'm glad you had a good day, and you certainly saw quite a bit. I think though, you'd have to take your time to follow Richards's itinerary!

The last time I was in St. Paul's, a few years back, unfortunately the gates to Nelson's tomb were locked, so I could only see it from a distance. As I sat with a consoling coffee from the coffee shop, at one of the tables, I was rather amused to be sat opposite the statue of St Vincent, which stands near the entrance. No wonder he had a grim expression!

You mentioned Nelson's famous signal, which as you show, is even wrong at his tomb. I'm not particularly surprised, as there has been considerable confusion regarding it ever since, and there certainly would have been in 1806. There are other examples, and even the Victory was flying the wrong flags until about 1908, when it was discovered that they were using the wrong signal book! However, I think the now accepted wording of the signal is: 'England expects that every man will do his duty'. To my mind not really an order, and I think the men would have done it whether it was or not.

Regarding the Waxwork in Westminster Abbey, this is perhaps my favourite too – and to my mind far better than the modern rendering of Nelson at the MRN, in Portsmouth. It was created by Catherine Andras, who was employed as wax artist to Queen Charlotte, in 1806. This was mainly through the clergy of the Abbey, who rather wanted to redress the balance of the vast numbers of people going to see Nelson's tomb in St Paul's and provide a counter attraction. Andras had been taken in by Robert Bowyer, a painter, and his wife and on one occasion Nelson had been to sit for the both of them. He is supposed to have quipped on that occasion, that he was not used to being taken both larboard and starboard at the same time! On Emma's going to see it, she thought it the most like Nelson himself. The story goes that she wanted to alter a lock of hair to cover his scar, and an attendant was rather upset – until he found out who she was, and allowed her to alter it.

Anyway good for you, although it does sound as if your partner was rather bored! :wink:

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 Post subject: Re: Nelson Places of Interest
PostPosted: Sun Sep 02, 2012 4:56 pm 
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This is a late response to Anna's post on 13 August concerning the Nelson Society's ' Nelson and Bath ' booklet. This is still available from them, as it is advertised in their last copy of the Nelson Dispatch. Price of £5.00 from Louis Hodgkin Mill Farm Woolley Bath BA1 8AP. I got my copy from there a while ago but like so many books I buy, I haven't got around to reading it yet. But it is packed with a lot of information and has some good illustrations, so would I think be a useful giude to anyone following Nelson's trail in the city.

Phil


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